VIDEO: Orthodox Liturgics

Part 4: The Order of Vespers

Part 3

St. Tikhon’s Monastery, the oldest Orthodox monastery in America, has published an in-depth, twelve-part video series on the fascinating yet complicated topic of Liturgics for Readers and Choir Directors in the Orthodox Christian tradition.

In this fourth lesson, Fr. Herman discusses the entire order of Vespers, noting differences between Daily Vespers and Great Vespers. The elements that make up Vespers are categorized into psalmody and hymnody (both variable and fixed), and litanies and prayers, each category being discussed in detail.

Our study of the structure and elements of Vespers will be an important step on our way to learning the order of Matins a bit later.

Part 5

Used with permission

Hieromonk Herman (Majkrzak), instructor
Ben Cabe, videographer

St. Tikhon’s Monastery

8/12/2018

Used with permission
See also
On the special dedications of the seven days of the week: when and to whom to pray On the special dedications of the seven days of the week: when and to whom to pray
Natalya Goroshkova, Archimandrite Nazary (Omelyanenko)
On the special dedications of the seven days of the week: when and to whom to pray On the special dedications of the seven days of the week: when and to whom to pray
Natalia Goroshkova, Archimandrite Nazary (Omelyanenko)
Every believer should go to church on Sundays in order to participate in the Divine Liturgy. Inasmuch as the Resurrection of Christ is the hope of all men we especially honor this day. It is best of all to spend this day after the Liturgy in charitable deeds: visiting the sick, helping those in need, and visiting the elderly. It would also behoove you on Sunday to devote a few hours to reading the Holy Scriptures and saying some prayers.
Outreach Overseas Outreach Overseas Outreach Overseas Outreach Overseas
Monk Cosmas
One of the brotherhood of the Monastery of St John, Fr Cosmas, is back at the monastery for Great Lent, Pascha, and Bright Week. Since October of last year, he has been in the Autonomous Territorial Unit of Gagauzia, a semi-independent area of southern Moldova, and will be returning there after Bright Week. He is on long-term assignment there, helping to prepare liturgical materials and other religious texts in the Gagauz language for use in the churches of that area.
A Mercy of Peace A Mercy of Peace
Fr. John Whiteford
A Mercy of Peace A Mercy of Peace
Fr. John Whiteford
Fr. John Whiteford answers the question: “I have heard it argued that the phrase in the Liturgy, “A mercy of peace, a sacrifice of praise” is both nonsensical and a corruption of an earlier text. Is this correct, and if not, what does the phrase mean?”
Comments
Here you can leave your comment on the present article, not exceeding 700 characters. All comments will be read by the editors of OrthoChristian.Com.
Enter through FaceBook
Your name:
Your e-mail:
Enter the digits, seen on picture:

Characters remaining: 700

Subscribe
to our mailing list

* indicates required
×