Venerable Martyrs Geronti, Serapion, German, Besarion, Mikael, Svimeon, and Otar of the Davit-Gareji Monastery (†1851)

Memory 12 (25) August

Throughout the 18th and 19th centuries the Dagestanis were continually raiding and pillaging the Davit-Gareji Wilderness. They destroyed churches and monasteries, stole sacred objects, and tortured and killed many of the monks who labored there.

A Dagestani army invaded the Davit-Gareji Wilderness in the summer of 1851. They looted the Davit-Gareji Lavra and carried off many of the monastery’s sacred treasures and books. Then they took many of the monks captive and tortured a few of the most pious.

First they stabbed Hierodeacon Otar to death, then they beheaded Hieromonk Geronti. The unbelievers battered Hieromonk Serapion to death with their swords.Monk German was stabbed in the stomach, then beheaded.Monk Besarion was also beheaded. The eighteen- year-old Svimeon tried to flee on foot but was shot at with bows and arrows, then caught and beheaded. Monk Mikael, the most outstanding among the brothers in humility and silence, was subjected to the harshest tortures.

After their martyrdom the bodies of these holy men were illumined with a divine light.

The martyrdom of the holy fathers of the Davit-Gareji Monastery was described in 1853 by Hieromonk Isaak of Gaenati, who witnessed the tragedy. Hieromonk Isaak himself was captured and led away to Dagestan by the merciless bandits. He was later freed through the mediation of Tsar Nicholas I (1825–1855).

O Lord our God, Thy holy martyrs Geronti, Serapion, German, Besarion, Mikael, Svimeon, and Otar were accounted worthy of Thine incorruptible crowns. By Thee they were granted the power to defeat ungodliness and cast down the powerless idols. Through their holy intercessions save our souls, O Christ God!

Archpriest Zakaria Machitadze


For further information on the book THE LIVES OF THE GEORGIAN SAINTS by Archpriest Zakaria Machitadze contact St. Herman Press:
St. Herman Press, P.O. Box 70, Platina, CA 96076
http://www.stherman.com/catalog/chapter_five/Lives_of_the_georgian_saints.htm

8/24/2007

See also
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Commemorated June 12/25
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Archpriest Zakaria Machitadze
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