The Ascension of Our Lord

God is ascended with jubilee, and the Lord with the sound of a trumpet.
Psalm 46:6

    

On the feast of the Ascension of our Lord we celebrate the fulfillment of the prophecy of King David, which is used as the Prokimenon of the day. What does it mean for Orthodox Christians? It is not only Jesus Christ Who has ascended; for He has raised human nature itself to the heavens. We too shall rise from the dead and, if we are judged worthy, will rise with our regenerated, spiritual body to heaven, where, as the Blessed Augustine says, “all the people of God shall be made equal to the angels.”

But the thought of this promise reminds us also of our responsibility. The risen Lord is no longer with us in the flesh, but only through His invisible Holy Spirit. The interim between the First and Second Coming of Christ is for us a time of witness and testimony of Him Whom we worship without seeing. The Lord, just before His Ascension, commanded His disciples: Go ye into all the world, and preach the Gospel to every creature (St. Mark 16:15); and He told them, Ye shall be my witnesses … unto the uttermost part of the earth (Acts 1:8).

Christ has been with us for forty days, and we have rightly feasted; we must now, being filled with the Holy Spirit of God, strive to spread His Gospel and be His witnesses before the world. For everything that we do, or fail to do, we shall be judged by Him Who shall return to earth in the same way He ascended to Heaven. With such a sobering thought in mind, how can we not be zealous to make His truth known, so that all may join in the joyous cry of this feast, Be thou exalted, O God, above the heavens, and Thy glory over all the earth (Psalm 107:6 LXX, 108:5 Hebrew text).

From The Heavenly Realm, St. Herman of Alaska Brotherhood, 1983

See also
The Feast of Mid-Pentecost The Feast of Mid-Pentecost
Hieromonk Seraphim (Rose)
The Feast of Mid-Pentecost The Feast of Mid-Pentecost
Hieromonk Seraphim (Rose)
As celebrated by Orthodox Christians, this feast occurs exactly midway between Easter and Pentecost and serves as a link between them. It continues the celebration of our Lord’s Resurrection, emphasizing His Divine nature and glory; for it was proper to no one but to God to conquer death.
Sermon on Ascension Day Sermon on Ascension Day
Archpriest Andrew Phillips
Sermon on Ascension Day Sermon on Ascension Day
Archpriest Andrew Phillips
But He ascends not as He came down. He ascends taking with Himself a human body, a human soul, a human mind, a human will, all the attributes of human nature, except of course for sin, for Christ's human nature is human nature as it was first intended to be, not fallen human nature, but human nature redeemed and made all comely.
Father Seraphim Rose - Living the Orthodox Worldview Father Seraphim Rose - Living the Orthodox Worldview
Hieromonk Seraphim (Rose)
Father Seraphim Rose - Living the Orthodox Worldview Father Seraphim Rose - Living the Orthodox Worldview
Hieromonk Seraphim (Rose)
Why is the truth, it would seem, revealed to some and not to others? Is there a special organ for receiving revelation from God? Yes, though usually we close it and do not let it open up: God’s revelation is given to something called a loving heart. This indicates that no matter how often we might hear the truth, if we have no love, we will not receive it; and to the contrary, though we may not even be searching for the truth, but have love, the truth may find us. But if others have not found the truth it would be madness for us to condemn them, saying “we have found the truth”, because our own possession of truth depends upon our loving heart.
From the Heart: Resting in the Ascension From the Heart: Resting in the Ascension From the Heart: Resting in the Ascension From the Heart: Resting in the Ascension
Summer is almost here. It’s a good time to just take a deep breath, and relax. You know, go to the beach if you live close to it, have a barbeque, invite some friends over. I remember doing this on a grand scale as a child growing up in New Jersey. But how often do most of us do this anymore? We’re so busy, we’ve forgotten that true rest and relaxation, the kind that really restores you, is vital to our survival.
Living the Orthodox World-View. Part 2 Living the Orthodox World-View. Part 2
Hieromonk Seraphim (Rose)
Living the Orthodox World-View. Part 2 Living the Orthodox World-View. Part 2
Hieromonk Seraphim (Rose)
Anyone who looks at our contemporary life from the perspective of the normal life lived by people in earlier times — say, Russia, or America, or any country of Western Europe in the 19th century—cannot help but be struck by the fact of how abnormal life has become today. The whole concept of authority and obedience, of decency and politeness, of public and private behavior — all have changed drastically, have been turned upside down except in a few isolated pockets of people — usually Christians of some kind — who try to preserve the so-called "old-fashioned" way of life.
Living the Orthodox World-View. Part 1 Living the Orthodox World-View. Part 1
Hieromonk Seraphim (Rose)
Living the Orthodox World-View. Part 1 Living the Orthodox World-View. Part 1
Hieromonk Seraphim (Rose)
A talk delivered by Hieromonk Seraphim (Rose) at the St. Herman Pilgrimage, August 1982, St. Herman of Alaska Monastery, Platina, California.
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