Romanian Orthodox Christians Worshiping In Small Places

Source: Edge of Humanity Magazine

Troite. Village of Viforata, Targoviste, Romania Troite. Village of Viforata, Targoviste, Romania
  

The content of this post was submitted to Edge of Humanity Magazine by Julian a citizen of the free world at UN CIUDADANO DEL MUNDO LIBRE.

Troite. Village of Viforata, Targoviste, Romania Troite. Village of Viforata, Targoviste, Romania
    

In Romania, according to the 2011 census, 86.5% of respondents declared themselves as being Orthodox Christians belonging to the Romanian Orthodox Church and this figure haven’t significantly changed since then. There’s an equal distribution of self-identified believers in rural and urban areas, as evidenced by the fact that almost every neighborhood of any medium and large-size city has its own church (a rude acknowledgement of this reality would be that there is a solid market demand for the religious phenomena).

Troite. Village of Viforata, Targoviste, Romania Troite. Village of Viforata, Targoviste, Romania
    

In rural areas, people build near the roads, in public but more often on their own private property. Small praying places sometimes having a nearby a water well. Despite that the public or private behavior of the villagers is not always Christian-like, the custom concerns both the social and self-image of those who build them, and also is supportive to the collective identity of a village. Moreover, on an individual level its function is to cherish someone’s memory, but on the community level its purpose is to keep alive the faith. This is a reflection of the human condition as understood in rural Romania.

Troite. Village of Viforata, Targoviste, Romania Troite. Village of Viforata, Targoviste, Romania
    

6/3/2015

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