Monument to Tsar-Martyr Nicholas opened in Russian mining town

Leninsk-Kuznetsky, Russia, September 1, 2017

Photo: mitropolia42.ru Photo: mitropolia42.ru
    

A new monument to Tsar-Martyr Nicholas II was opened and consecrated on Tuesday in the Russian mining town of Leninsk-Kuznetsky in the Kemerovo Province, reports the site of the Kuzbass Diocese of the Russian Orthodox Church.

The opening ceremony began with the rite of consecration of the monument which was celebrated by His Eminence Aristarchos of Kemerovo and Prokopyevsk, along with Archpriest Vitaly Makarov, Fr. John Pavlyuk, and Deacon Vyacheslav Lansky. In addition to the faithful laity, the consecration was attended by local civil authorities. The service was sung by the choir of the Church of the New Martyrs and Confessors of the Russian Church in Leninsk-Kuznetsky.

Photo: mitropolia42.ru Photo: mitropolia42.ru
In his homily, Met. Aristarchos noted that the installation of the monument to the last Russian tsar marks the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the persecution of the Russian Church, and the upcoming centenary of the slaughter of the royal family. He also spoke about how the 1917 revolution was a turning point in the history of the whole of Russia, changing not only its constitutional structure, but the mentality of the Russian people, who lost their Christian values. The installation of such a monument to Tsar Nicholas II is a good deed that helps to restore historical objectivity, according to the bishop.

The land that is now the city of Leninsk-Kuznetsky once personally belonged to the reigning tsar, and when coal reserves were discovered on it, he personally ordered the creation of a society for its extraction, which eventually gave rise to Kolchugino, and then Leninsk-Kuznetsky.

Moreover, the bronze statue was installed on the square of the Palace of Culture and Arts, which until recently bore the name of Yemelyan Yaroslavsky, one of the most ardent atheists and persecutors of the Orthodox Church.

9/1/2017

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