Does the Pure One Have Need of Purification?

SOURCE: Mystagogy. The Weblog Of John Sanidopoulos

The Meeting of the Lord; XVI century. Greece. Mount Athos, monastery Dionysiou The Meeting of the Lord; XVI century. Greece. Mount Athos, monastery Dionysiou
    

The original Greek of Luke 2:22 reads:

"Kαι οτε επλησθησαν αι ημεραι του καθαρισμου αυτων κατα τον νομον μωυσεως ανηγαγον αυτον εις ιεροσολυμα παραστησαι τω κυριω...."

The King James Version translates this verse as follows:

"And when the days of her purification according to the law of Moses were accomplished, they brought him to Jerusalem, to present him to the Lord;..."

We see here that the KJV erroneously translates this verse to read "days of her purification". However, a puristic translation of the text would be translated as "days of their purification".

It is well known that the KJV makes these "errors" often whenever references to doctrines about Mary are conveyed in the Gospels, but this is one of those verses that if mistranslated has tremendous implications; the Theotokos has no need of purification. Rather this passage refers to the Jews and what the Law of Moses prescribed for them.

The Venerable Bede commenting on this passage writes:

"The firstborn of all the male sex was to be called holy to the Lord (Lev. 12:1-6). The Virgin did not receive seed, but even as our Lord willed to be under the Law, so that He might redeem us (Gal. 4:4-5), so too did the blessed Mother, who by a singular privilege was above the Law; nevertheless, she did not shun being made subject to the principles of the Law for the sake of showing us an example of humility" (Homily on the Feast of the Purification).

2/15/2014

See also
The Song of Simeon, the Presentation of Christ, and the Greek Old Testament The Song of Simeon, the Presentation of Christ, and the Greek Old Testament
Gabe Martini
The Song of Simeon, the Presentation of Christ, and the Greek Old Testament The Song of Simeon, the Presentation of Christ, and the Greek Old Testament
Gabe Martini
The Nunc dimittis or Song of Simeon is a recorded response as this old, frail servant of the Lord beholds the incarnate Lord of Glory for the very first time. In this moment, he knew his life was complete; he had fulfilled his purpose. Interestingly enough, there is a significant back-story to this presentation of Christ, and to the elder Simeon’s response.
The Meeting of the Lord The Meeting of the Lord The Meeting of the Lord The Meeting of the Lord
The Church teaches the Law of God, righteousness and piety, and the gifts of the Holy Spirit are bestowed in the Mystery of Chrismation; but meeting God always requires the exploit of faith ­ the readiness to accept everything that will be pleasing to Him.
The Meeting of Our Lord The Meeting of Our Lord
Archbishop Dmitri (Royster)
The Meeting of Our Lord The Meeting of Our Lord
Archbishop Dmitri (Royster)
God literally entered the world, into time and history. He was physically present in the midst of His people, His creatures whom He loves. Our Lord took on human nature in order to reconcile unto Himself, man who had strayed far from the Source of his life.
The Meeting of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ in the Temple The Meeting of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ in the Temple The Meeting of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ in the Temple The Meeting of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ in the Temple
The Feast of the Meeting of the Lord is among the most ancient feasts of the Christian Church. Despite its early origin, this Feast was not celebrated so splendidly until the sixth century.
Presentation of Christ in the Temple Presentation of Christ in the Temple Presentation of Christ in the Temple Presentation of Christ in the Temple
An important custom was for the couple to take their first-born son to the Temple. The baby was taken to the Temple forty days after his birth and was dedicated to God. In addition, if the parents were wealthy, they were to bring a lamb and a young pigeon or a turtle dove to be offered as a sacrifice at the Temple. The custom provided that if the parents were poor, they were to offer two pigeons or two turtle doves for the sacrifice.
Comments
Here you can leave your comment on the present article, not exceeding 700 characters. All comments will be read by the editors of OrthoChristian.Com.
Enter through FaceBook
Your name:
Your e-mail:
Enter the digits, seen on picture:

Characters remaining: 700

Subscribe
to our mailing list

* indicates required
×